Planning for the Community vs. Planning for the Plan | Domestic Preparedness Photo: FEMA/Bradley Carroll (25 May 2011)
Commentary

Planning for the Community vs. Planning for the Plan

by W. Craig Fugate -

Imagine a family losing their home, their belongings – everything. With nowhere to go, they find the nearest shelter, only to be turned away due to shelter restrictions. Maybe it was because they have a dog, or one of their children has a disability, or they have an elderly parent with them. Regardless of the reason, they are turned away. When planning for a community, that should never happen.

 
Commentary

Physically Uninjured – A Survivor’s Perspective

by Lisa Hamp -

A mass casualty incident leaves many victims in its wake. Beyond those who are tragically killed, survivors also suffer from the physical and psychological effects of the incident. Unfortunately, the psychologically injured can sometimes go unnoticed. One survivor of the Virginia Tech shooting in 2007 recounts her story of survival and her journey back to recovery.

Healthcare

Wearable Sensors for Chemical & Biological Detection

by Richard M. Ozanich -

One of the strengths of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is the ability to conduct comprehensive technology foraging and objective assessments of various technology areas. This article highlights leading research by others in the area of chemical and biological (chem/bio) detection that could be further developed into robust, highly integrated wearables to aid preparedness, response, and recovery.

Resilience

Plan Big, Even to Respond Small

by Donald (Doc) Lumpkins -

In emergency planning efforts, there is much debate about whether to plan for the worst and scale down, or plan for current threats and scale up. Of course, in complex systems, small changes in initial conditions can have profound effects. By considering larger, low-frequency events, communities can overcome this challenge and be better prepared for disasters of all sizes.

Preparedness

Preparing for High-Impact, Low-Probability (HILP) Events

by Jerome H. Kahan -

The interconnected global environment can increase the number of vulnerabilities as well as the destabilizing effects of both natural and human-caused disasters. As such, when a high-impact, low-probability event occurs, the consequences can be devastating. To prepare for such events, planners must observe trends, predict futures, and create scenarios for better mitigating any potential threat.

Commentary

Next Responder of the Future

by Kay C. Goss & Catherine L. Feinman -

Each year, experienced emergency management and first responder personnel are retiring from their careers, and retiring the vital skills that they spent their lifetimes learning. As the next generation of young adults moves into these fields, it is critical for the knowledge, skills, and abilities of the previous generations to be passed on through education, training, and mentorships. Some organizations are leading this effort with youth programs that strive to attract new interest in emergency preparedness and response.

Commentary

Advice from W. Craig Fugate: Learn, Do Not Just Observe

by W. Craig Fugate -

I was only 31 when I started in emergency management. There are a lot of young emergency mangers out there faced with some pretty hefty responsibilities. If I were to provide advice to the next generation of emergency managers, I would say this: …

Resilience

FEMA Corps: Bringing in the Next Generation

by Richard Serino & Jennifer Grimes -

When Hurricane Sandy struck the east coast in 2012, its effects were devastating. The storm left a trail of destruction that affected 24 states, killing 159 people, costing $70.2 billion in damage, and leaving millions without power. Yet, in the wake of this terrible disaster, there was a new source of hope: A group of young AmeriCorps members working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) newly launched FEMA Corps assisted the recovery effort.

Commentary

Help Wanted: Next Generation of Emergency Managers

by Catherine L. Feinman -

Veterans, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials compose the majority of the modern workforce, but the next generation (Generation Z) is now beginning to emerge from schools and colleges. Before this new generation transforms into a significant portion of the workforce, it is important to determine what makes these young people unique and what they can offer to the emergency management field.

Commentary

Emergency Management: Not Just for Emergency Managers

by Martin D. Masiuk -

This special edition of the DomPrep Journal focuses on the field of emergency management, which embodies the essence of DomPrep’s mission: to bridge the emergency preparedness gap between disciplines and jurisdictions. True leaders in the field demonstrate through continued action that emergency preparedness does not begin or end with a job title.

Updates

DHS S&T Awards Metronome Software $750K to Strengthen Security of First Responder Sensor Systems

Metronome Software, with funding provided by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), is developing a technology solution that will significantly enhance the security of mobile device-based sensor systems used by first responders. This solution will provide multi-layer threat protection and immediate situational awareness to first responders.

CPUC Unveils CalEclipse.org For Californians to Take the Pledge To Do Your Thing During the Great Solar Eclipse

The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) unveiled CalEclipse.org with a call to Californians to Do Your Thing and reduce electricity use during The Great Solar Eclipse on August 21, 2017. This will allow California to burn fewer fossil fuels and emit fewer greenhouse gas emissions when California’s solar energy production dips during the eclipse.

CDC Invests More Than $200 Million to Help States Respond to Infectious Disease Threats

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has awarded more than $200 million through the Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Infectious Diseases cooperative agreement to help states, cities, counties, and territories prevent, detect, respond to, and control the growing threats posed by emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

NIST Funds 12 Projects to Make Communities More Resilient to Disasters

The U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology(NIST) has awarded just over $6 million for 12 disaster resilience research projects. The grants support NIST’s efforts to strengthen the ability of communities to prepare for anticipated hazards, adapt to changing conditions, and withstand and recover rapidly from disruptions.

DHS Selects George Mason University for Criminal Investigations and Network Analysis Center of Excellence

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate announced the selection of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, to lead a consortium of U.S. academic institutions and other partners for a new Center of Excellence in Criminal Investigations and Network Analysis.